Thin Baby

All the other babies you see are roly-poly and yours is long and thin, say 25th percentile in weight. The doctor says that he’s doing fine and you shouldn’t worry, but you do.

The truth is that slender babies are as healthy as their roly-poly peers and sometimes healthier. Your cause of concern is much understood, with the roly-poly babies shown in the commercials, and the general society expectations of every baby being a chubby baby.

In your situation, there should be no cause of concern as the doctor as pointed out, if in general:

  • Your baby is alert, active, and basically content
  • Is gaining weight steadily, and
  • If his weight, though on the low side of average, continues to keep pace with his height.

The factors that affect a baby’s size are sometimes such that you can do very little about it. Factors such as:

  • Genetic factors- if you, the parents, are small-boned, your baby is likely to be too.
  • An active baby who burns his calories faster than inactive ones.

The factors that need action from your side for remedy are:

  • Underfeeding. Do not underfeed the baby intentionally.
  • Some parents who try to keep the baby slim for future slimness and good health limit their fat and calorie intake. This is a very Dangerous practise since infants need both fat and calories for their growth and development. Parents can start them on good eating habits without depriving them of nourishment they need now.
  • Be sure that your baby is not busy sleeping or in other activities that he forgets to demand food. In this concern, make sure to have set mealtimes and offer your baby food by either interrupting his sleep or an exciting playtime.

Rarely, a baby’s poor weight gain is related to the inability to absorb certain nutrients, a metabolic rate that is out of a kilter, or an infectious chronic disease in which you can probably notice other symptoms. This illness requires prompt medical attention.